Midwest Genealogy Center Building

The Midwest Genealogy Center opened in June 2008. The largest free-standing public genealogy library in the United States boasts 52,000 square feet of resources for family history researchers.

The Magic of a Simple Life – Celebrating 150 Years of Laura Ingalls Wilder

Celebrate the 150th birthday of Missouri writer Laura Ingalls Wilder with stories and pictures from her life and times as well as recordings of her voice and Pa’s fiddle. Everyone in attendance will receive a small activity booklet to take home.

Folk Songs of Missouri and Kansas

Join Under the Big Oak Tree for a performance of Ozark Mountain folk songs found in the Max Hunter Collection at Missouri State University. Hear the music and learn the history behind it.

LOCK IN: Late Night at MGC

Stay up late at the Midwest Genealogy Center for a night of learning and fun! Use these extra hours to dig deeper into your family history. Stay fueled with food and drinks, and enjoy research breaks with presentations and prizes throughout the evening. Registration fee is $20.

Genealogy Blogs

MGC’s Website Has Been Selected As One of 101 Best Genealogy Websites of 2016!

Every year, Family Tree Magazine chooses 101 websites that best represent current trends and innovation in genealogy research, and the Midwest Genealogy Center has been included within the category of Best Genealogy Library Websites. This is an exciting honor because Library staff have been working hard to provide access to quality genealogy content. 

Records from the past

There are two types of records when it comes to genealogy— official and unofficial. Official records are records generated by a governmental agency such as birth records from a state or military service records from the national government. These records are usually available at a cost and are subject to various privacy laws. Unofficial records include these same types of records but are easier to access through databases and other websites and can be obtained at little to no cost.

Where Do You Search When Church Records or Courthouses Burned?

Every genealogy enthusiast will encounter this at some point; you need a record, but that record cannot be found because a church or a courthouse was damaged. All is not necessarily lost! First, determine if the rumors are true that a repository has actually been destroyed and/or damaged. If it turns out that a courthouse burned during the Civil War, there are still ways to access the lost information. You can look for alternative records, partial records, or records that were later reconstructed. After a disaster, there could have been a call to re-record county records.

What does the map say?

Maps can offer rich details about an ancestor. They can show where someone lived, what that land was like, and even show how much land they owned. This last type of map is called a plat map. Plat maps were created by towns, counties, or any type of office that maintained land. These entities would map out property boundaries and land ownership. Information such as this can be a boon to genealogists; you can find out if your ancestor owned land and who owned land around them.

Passport to Happiness

Summer is here, and all I am thinking about is vacation (and, of course, genealogy). My family vacations don’t take me to exotic places, but I do get to see lots of family and do some fun things. I began to wonder if my ancestors took vacations to faraway places or if they simply took their kids to visit their grandparents like me.

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